STEP’s first Virtual UK Annual Tax Conference

Robert CaringtonThe first STEP Virtual STEP UK Annual Tax Conference was held on 26 June with over 800 people attending online. The day was a radical departure for STEP, with conventional meetings postponed or cancelled due to COVID-19. While it did include some glitches, attendees have the opportunity to catch up on any material they missed, with presentations available for a full year.

The day saw some outstanding STEP members speaking on topical matters, and we were delighted to host Emma Chamberlain OBE TEP, Robert Jamieson TEP, John Barnett TEP, Dawn Register TEP, Katherine Bullock TEP, John Woolley TEP and Deborah Clark TEP.

Emma Chamberlain presented the first session, giving an update on inheritance tax (IHT), which covered the Barclays Wealth case and the resulting legislation on excluded property settlements; and the definition of charity in IHT after the Routier case and its implications. She noted the work done by the Office of Tax Simplification and the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Inheritance & Intergenerational Fairness (APPG) on IHT reform was something to watch.

Robert Jamieson TEP covered capital gains tax (CGT) main residence relief and the statutory changes in the Finance Bill 2020 relating to residency, in a comprehensive presentation.

John Barnett TEP gave an informative update on Agricultural Property Relief (APR) and Business Property Relief (BPR), covering their structure, key cases such as Gill and Brander; and finishing with predictions on their reform; he noted that the CGT uplift was the most likely to be reformed by any government in the near future.

The afternoon session started with Dawn Register TEP giving advice on dealing with HMRC, covering areas such as its No Safe Havens 2019 programme to ensure offshore tax compliance and its risk assessment process. She also explained changes made due to the COVID-19 pandemic, including the relaxation of some deadlines.

Katherine Bullock TEP followed with a practical session focused on such IHT calculations as chargeable lifetime gifts, how to arrange settlements and when grossing up is necessary.

John Woolley TEP was next with an update on pension transfers and lump sum IHT plans following the Staverley decision in the Supreme Court in May 2019. John covered the advantages and disadvantages of death benefits being paid through either flexi access drawdown or by-pass trusts the protection of funds on divorce or insolvency; and dealing with the valuation issues of the ten-year periodic charge and their impact on loan trusts and discounted gift trusts, as well as any problems that may arise.

The final presentation of the day was from Deborah Clark TEP who spoke on family investment companies and their use. Her presentation covered their structure and funding and asset protection as well as how they were treated by income tax.

  • Our thanks to the event’s sponsors: James’s Place, Fraser and Fraser, National Philanthropic Trust, Octopus Investments, and Remember a Charity.

Robert Carington is Policy Executive at STEP

STEP joins Anti-Money Laundering Europe webinar on the future of the EU’s fight against money laundering

Robert CaringtonOn 3 June, STEP joined a webinar hosted by Anti-Money Laundering Europe (AME) on the future of the European Union’s fight against money laundering.

John Riches TEP, Chair of STEP’s Public Policy Committee, was joined on the panel by Jérôme Deslandes, Cabinet of the Executive Vice President of the European Commission; and Piers Haben, Director for Banking Markets, Innovation and Consumers at the European Banking Authority (EBA). The chair was Mike Savarese, AME.

The webinar discussed the European Commission’s package on anti-money laundering (AML) published on 7 May.

Its main item was an action plan, accompanied by a list of high-risk third countries, and a methodology describing how these were chosen. The action plan aimed to address the weaknesses identified in research from 2019 and was based on the following six pillars:

  1. Better implementation of rules – This will be achieved by a number of tools particularly interconnection of beneficial ownership registers, more powers for the EBA and a focus on country-specific recommendations. The eventual aim is for an EU supervisory body responsible for conducting on-site examination on the effectiveness of the AML framework.
  2. Harmonised rulebook – This will be achieved by sharing information, integrating the latest Financial Action Task Force (FATF) standards and building on the good examples of member states.
  3. EU level supervision – This integrated AML system will need to be jointly run by the EU and national authorities.
  4. Coordination and support mechanisms for FIUs (Financial Intelligence Units) –Through common templates and tools, standards on feedback, support of joint analysis and training.
  5. Law enforcement and information sharing – New tools such as criminalisation of money laundering, a Directive on the use of financial information and rules on asset recovery (including mutual recognition of freezing orders) will be used.
  6. EU’s global role – This will be achieved through the new methodology and the list of high-risk third party jurisdictions that pose a threat to the EU’s financial system.

John Riches’ view on these developments from a private sector perspective, was that due to the rapid development of the EU’s AML framework, member states appear to have struggled to implement past incarnations of AML. He observed that there seemed to be an inconsistency in approach between states, resulting from a lack of clarity and practical guidance.

His main concerns were over beneficial ownership registers and transparency, and how this lack of clarity had made implementation of trust registers difficult, and also potentially unfair. He noted that the uncertainty over some of the provisions in the Fifth Anti-Money Laundering Directive showed a lack of understanding on how trusts work. He also voiced major concerns over the potential conflict of public registers versus privacy rights.

The panel heard that the EU is aiming to be assessed as a single jurisdiction, with a single supervisor and rule book, within five years, so will be recognised as such by FATF. This single approach is seen as being cheaper and more efficient, and a more effective way of achieving a stronger, more unified and robust system.

The event ended with John Riches stressing that the EC consultation should be much more than a box-ticking exercise, and something more meaningful, which will benefit everyone.

Robert Carington is Policy Executive at STEP

The COVID-19 crisis prompts a rash of philanthropic giving

Robert CaringtonOn 13 May 2020 the STEP Philanthropy Special Interest Group (SIG) in partnership with Philanthropy Impact hosted the first of its 2020 Philanthropy Programme series of events with a webinar entitled ‘Core Components of a Professional Philanthropy Advisory Practice’.

The event attracted a number of delegates from 18 different jurisdictions, and discussed a range of issues for philanthropy advisors. It was ably hosted by George King IV, Partner, MASECO Private Wealth; with Jo Bateson TEP, Partner, KPMG; Cath Dovey, Co-founder, Beacon Collaborative; and Alana Petraske, Partner, Withers Worldwide LLP, on the panel.

The current COVID-19 crisis and the deep and radical changes in society it has brought has prompted an increase in people wishing to give, and brought about a more important role for the philanthropy advisor. This means it is essential for advisors to have the right tools in place, and to be aware of clients’ shift in attitudes towards philanthropic giving, and what it involves.

Advisors need to feel comfortable about providing advice, especially while getting used to new ways of working. While much work can be done online, there are still concerns over physical actions, like signing cheques for clients, although on a positive note, many regulators have taken a pragmatic approach, recognising the need to work remotely.

A number of reasons were given for the increase in charitable giving. Clients want to be seen to be doing something, or they are using the increased ‘spare time’ to reflect on their place in society and how they could better themselves, with charitable giving being a solution. Many are acting in response to the current situation with a sense of urgency, and want to donate as quickly as possible.

During the first two weeks of the crisis, established infrastructure funds were able to utilise pre-existing networks and donate immediately and strategically. Subsequently there was a broader response, with non-regular clients and new donors emerging. Many of these had used the first few weeks to get their own affairs in order, and then wanted to act with speed. Anecdotal evidence showed that donors range from those with structures in place, to those who need preliminary hand-holding.

Even though the crisis is a generation-defining moment and clients want to donate quickly, several on the panel urged advisors to recommend clients should hold fire, and instead research their charities of interest, with a view to deploying their wealth strategically over a longer period (6 -12 months). It’s vital to manage clients’ anxiety and also assess the risk factors, as charities will be in distress for some time, and many will not survive at all. Reports show that in the UK, 40-70 per cent of charities may be dissolved in the next 12 months.

Another key, and indeed quite obvious issue is whether the client has sufficient money to give. The outbreak has brought out basic level survival instincts (such as the run on loo paper) and if someone feels under attack from the virus, they may not want to give, or feel they can’t.

The panel also suggested advisors be mindful of their own businesses, and review what they expect to happen in the next 6 months – 2 years. Points to consider include: where their work comes from, what will future working will look like, and what clients will be seeking from them. However, now is the perfect moment for advisors to be the philanthropy champion at work and integrate philanthropy into wealth planning.

The event ended with the panel highlighting what they felt were the key skills required for advisors in the industry:

  • Collaboration and the importance of building up a community which you can utilise and engage with.
  • Honesty regarding your skills, and being prepared to practice and train those who need further improvement.
  • To focus on a useful knowledge base, such as understanding what grant makers and other key players are doing.

 

 

Robert Carington is Policy Executive at STEP