Update from HMRC’s Trusts and Estates team

HMRC’s Trusts and Estates team met with the Agents Advisory Group and Capital Taxes Liaison Group in May and provided the following updates:

Operational update

Despite the unique challenges presented by the current COVID-19 situation, inheritance tax and trusts operational areas are currently meeting all key targets and processing post and new accounts within published turnaround times.

A new webchat service was launched in May, which can be used to obtain help when completing the IHT400 forms and schedules, and to answer other inheritance tax and probate questions.

HMRC confirmed that IHT421 forms can now be emailed directly from HMRC to HM Courts and Tribunals Service. HMRC is unable to email customers due to security protocols in place, but will either reply in writing, or add a note to the calculations.

There have been periods when the Trusts Helpline call response times have increased. If you are experiencing problems getting through, you can email HMRC at trustsfeedback@hmrc.gov.uk.

Digital signatures for IHT205

HMRC confirms that the digital signature process now applies to IHT205 forms, as well at IHT400 and IHT100 forms, until further notice. It will accept IHT205 forms that are not physically signed from professional agents, if:

  • the names and personal details of the legal personal representatives are shown on the declaration page;
  • the account has been seen by all the legal personal representatives, and they all agree to be bound by the declaration;
  • the agent includes the following statement:
    ‘As the agent acting on behalf, I confirm that all the people whose names appear on the declaration page of this Inheritance Tax Return have both seen the Inheritance Tax Return and agreed to be bound by the declaration on page 8 of the form IHT205.’

The GOV.UK website has been updated to reflect these changes.

Electronic submission of IHT form update

HMRC is offering Dropbox as a temporary measure to support agents when it is not possible or practical to submit IHT400 and IHT100 accounts by post during the COVID-19 disruption.

HMRC retains full ownership of all information/data that it places in Dropbox and all information/data that an agent submits there. Only the HMRC Dropbox account holder and the HMRC security audit team can access the information.

Time limits and penalties for late filing and payment

HMRC has updated the guidance on reasonable excuse to include occasions where customers have not been able to file their accounts on time due to the impact of COVID-19.

Claim time limits for IHT reliefs

HMRC has enquired about deadlines for IHT relief claims that may be impacted by the present disruption customers are facing. The three areas which have been raised are the time limits for: relief on property sales, relief on sale of shares and instruments of variation. HMRC is continuing to monitor the position.

STEP will continue to monitor the developments and update members accordingly.

Emily Deane TEP, STEP Technical Counsel

Belonging to a supportive organisation like STEP come into its own in such difficult times

Denese MolyneuxWhen writing this blog, usually the first thing I do is to refer to my previous one I posted to comment or update England and Wales members on items mentioned. Not this time.

The worldwide COVID-19 pandemic has affected everyone, whether they have contracted the virus or not. It is in such circumstances that the benefits of being a member of a supportive organisation really come into their own.

Mark Walley and the team at STEP Head Office are to be congratulated on keeping things on an even keel throughout this period of immense upheaval. While managing the logistics of moving to home working, the staff have pulled together resources to help members keep fully updated, starting with the COVID-19 Technical Hub on the STEP website. After that there are any number of links to new information, from holding virtual meetings; changes to examinations; rescheduled conferences; maintaining CPD and just about any other subject of relevance. The Communications team has excelled itself in managing the STEP online offering to best support the membership.

Life goes on and in other non-COVID news, The All Party Parliamentary Group for Inheritance Tax and Intergenerational Fairness was launched on 28 January to positive media coverage. STEP’s involvement with this initiative has served to enhance our reputation and strengthened stakeholder relationships in this vital area.

The Legal Services Board is currently reviewing how to ensure that legal professionals remain competent throughout their careers. The call for evidence deadline has been extended to 26 June, and STEP will be making a submission to that review.

HMRC is keen to raise standards in the tax advice market and has called for evidence to support the UK Government’s crackdown on promoters of tax avoidance schemes. It is also conducting a review to give taxpayers assurance that advice received from professionals is reliable. Again STEP will be giving a response.

As we emerge from the unusual circumstances in which we find ourselves it will be interesting to see which parts of our lives revert to existence pre-COVID. By the time of my next blog in December, I hope we will have had the England and Wales Branch Chairs Assembly – maybe via video conference. I look forward to hearing your own experiences and sharing some new, and quite probably unforeseen, best practice.

 

Denese Molyneux TEP, Chair, STEP England and Wales Regional Committee

STEP joins Anti-Money Laundering Europe webinar on the future of the EU’s fight against money laundering

Robert CaringtonOn 3 June, STEP joined a webinar hosted by Anti-Money Laundering Europe (AME) on the future of the European Union’s fight against money laundering.

John Riches TEP, Chair of STEP’s Public Policy Committee, was joined on the panel by Jérôme Deslandes, Cabinet of the Executive Vice President of the European Commission; and Piers Haben, Director for Banking Markets, Innovation and Consumers at the European Banking Authority (EBA). The chair was Mike Savarese, AME.

The webinar discussed the European Commission’s package on anti-money laundering (AML) published on 7 May.

Its main item was an action plan, accompanied by a list of high-risk third countries, and a methodology describing how these were chosen. The action plan aimed to address the weaknesses identified in research from 2019 and was based on the following six pillars:

  1. Better implementation of rules – This will be achieved by a number of tools particularly interconnection of beneficial ownership registers, more powers for the EBA and a focus on country-specific recommendations. The eventual aim is for an EU supervisory body responsible for conducting on-site examination on the effectiveness of the AML framework.
  2. Harmonised rulebook – This will be achieved by sharing information, integrating the latest Financial Action Task Force (FATF) standards and building on the good examples of member states.
  3. EU level supervision – This integrated AML system will need to be jointly run by the EU and national authorities.
  4. Coordination and support mechanisms for FIUs (Financial Intelligence Units) –Through common templates and tools, standards on feedback, support of joint analysis and training.
  5. Law enforcement and information sharing – New tools such as criminalisation of money laundering, a Directive on the use of financial information and rules on asset recovery (including mutual recognition of freezing orders) will be used.
  6. EU’s global role – This will be achieved through the new methodology and the list of high-risk third party jurisdictions that pose a threat to the EU’s financial system.

John Riches’ view on these developments from a private sector perspective, was that due to the rapid development of the EU’s AML framework, member states appear to have struggled to implement past incarnations of AML. He observed that there seemed to be an inconsistency in approach between states, resulting from a lack of clarity and practical guidance.

His main concerns were over beneficial ownership registers and transparency, and how this lack of clarity had made implementation of trust registers difficult, and also potentially unfair. He noted that the uncertainty over some of the provisions in the Fifth Anti-Money Laundering Directive showed a lack of understanding on how trusts work. He also voiced major concerns over the potential conflict of public registers versus privacy rights.

The panel heard that the EU is aiming to be assessed as a single jurisdiction, with a single supervisor and rule book, within five years, so will be recognised as such by FATF. This single approach is seen as being cheaper and more efficient, and a more effective way of achieving a stronger, more unified and robust system.

The event ended with John Riches stressing that the EC consultation should be much more than a box-ticking exercise, and something more meaningful, which will benefit everyone.

Robert Carington is Policy Executive at STEP