What can you do to improve employee engagement?

Christopher TaliaWe all know that employee engagement is important, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy to get right. Next month’s STEP Employer Partnership Programme (EPP) Summer Forum will look at this key area, and help you devise a strategy that works for your organisation.

Employee engagement can mean different things to different people. Some will see it as recognition, others as financial reward. No matter how you view it, employee engagement holds three distinctive characteristics: realising employee potential; clear and shared organisational goals; and promoting employee wellbeing.

Many organisations fall short of achieving one, or all of these factors, leaving employees feeling under-appreciated, and in turn, unwilling to perform at their full potential. So how can employers bridge the ‘employee engagement’ gap while ensuring business success?

The forum, Employee engagement: boosting employee capability and potential for business success, will be hosted by Platinum Employer Partner RSM, and will share valuable insights from the following industry practitioners:

All our speakers have substantial experience in different jurisdictions including Guernsey, Jersey, Switzerland and the UK. Each will share her own experiences, strategies and learning on how they have successfully developed and implemented programmes to support employee engagement.

Key topics will include: what employee engagement means, understanding flexibility in the workplace and understanding gender diversity and inclusion.

If you have ever wanted to know how you can increase both your employees’ potential and their engagement levels, then this is the forum for you. I look forward to seeing you there to learn more about employee engagement.

Christopher Talia, Programme Manager, Employer Partnership Programme, STEP (Christopher will officially join the EPP team from mid-July).

STEP meets HMCTS to discuss EW probate delays

Emily Deane TEPSTEP met HM Courts & Tribunals Service (HMCTS) this week to discuss the backlog of applications and continued disruption to the Probate Service.

HMCTS representatives explained its old database needed to be upgraded, which had prompted the decision to move to digital software. The new system was scheduled to go live in January but was delayed until 25 March following technical glitches. HMCTS explained that it had not anticipated this level of issues with the technology, in conjunction with such a high spike in probate applications.

The following points were raised:

  • HMCTS has brought in 15-20 more people for the national office; a 10-15 per cent increase in those working on the backlogged applications.
  • The remaining probate registries will be closed over the next 12 months. Staff will be given six months’ notice and HMCTS expects to help them all find other roles in the civil service.
  • The new digital system is being delivered from the Courts and Tribunals Service centre based in Birmingham. HMCTS is keen to get more solicitors using the digital pilot, and will be looking for volunteers shortly. This pilot will enable solicitors to issue up to 250 applications per week.
  • Cases are taking up to 30 working days to be processed at the moment.
  • The Probate Registry will publish regular bulletins to improve communication with the public.
  • HMCTS assures users its existing Registry staff are working hard to get through the applications, and issued 960 grants on a single day this week.
  • HMCTS requests users not to chase applications, as they are being dealt with by date order.
  • HMCTS is currently up to date with caveats.

STEP expressed its disappointment that the court service was not better equipped to deal with the spike in applications. The Ministry of Justice had issued reassurances earlier this year that the court service was prepared for an increase due to the proposed increase in probate fees. STEP noted HMCTS was ill prepared to merge the new online system, change the format of the certificate, close registries and cut staff all at once. 

STEP repeated its suggestion that HMCTS should change the fee implementation date to the date of death for applications, to relieve the pressure and generate some goodwill amongst the industry and the public. The idea should be seriously considered, given pressure on practitioners and members of the public is considerable, and is causing a great deal of anxiety. 

STEP has also provided feedback to HMCTS on errors in the new-style grants that members have received, together with feedback on how they could be improved. We have explained why the will should continue to be annexed to the grant of probate, and the difficulties caused if it is not.

The Statutory Instrument to increase probate fees is still waiting to be scheduled for approval in parliament, and we will continue to monitor and report any developments (latest update).

Emily Deane TEP, STEP Technical Counsel

What’s happening with the Probate Fees order?

Daniel Nesbitt

The status of the EW probate fee order is the same as it has been since February – it is still waiting for its final stage. As it was not scheduled for debate next week, ie w/c 13 May, it will not be possible to bring the new fees in before June.

Following last week’s Business Questions (where the future parliamentary business is set out) there has been a slight change of tone from the government on scheduling the order. In answer to a question, the Leader of the House of Commons, Andrea Leadsom, said the order had already been debated in committee and an approval motion would be brought in due course. Previously she had said ‘where a reasonable request for a debate has been made, time should be allowed for that debate’.

This may mean the government will actively try to avoid a full debate in the House of Commons. Labour seems keen to bring it to a vote and has raised it at a few business questions.

Parliament is due to have its Whitsun Recess from 23 May to 4 June 2019, so that will further limit opportunities to bring the order to the House of Commons. The summer recess date has not yet been announced and will likely depend on the Brexit negotiations, and whether a deal can be passed (the last two summer recesses have started in late July, which may be a guide).

The summer recess will mark the end of the parliamentary session, and whilst secondary legislation not passed before this point is usually abandoned it can be brought back in the following session.  

There are rumours that Theresa May is not planning to hold a substantive Queen’s Speech at the opening of the next session, which would mean there would only be a limited programme of legislation for the government and it would be easier to find time to fit it back in. However, the government may try to bring the order to its final stage before the summer recess.

Daniel Nesbitt, Policy Executive, STEP